National Traditional Country Music Association inducts Taylor Pie into Hall of Fame

National Traditional Country Music Assn.

P.O. Box 492, Anita, Iowa, 50020

712-762-4363 www.ntcma.net

April 20, 2015

Hello Pie:

As President of the National Traditional Country Music Association, it is my extreme pleasure to inform you that Jerre Haskew has nominated you to be inducted into America’s Old Time Country Music Hall of Fame. The Board of Directors of the NTCMA have confirmed your nomination and induction.

Ceremonies will take place during the 40th Annual National Traditional Country/Bluegrass/Folk/Gospel Festival and Convention, held at the Plymouth County Fairgrounds in Le Mars, Iowa. Dates for this year’s event are August 31 through September 6, 2015.

After reviewing your credentials, I am personally very happy to see this take place. If you are able to be with us, you can select any day the festival is being held. Please take note that the event itself is an acoustic music event with some ten stages and over 600 acoustic music makers. We will arrange an acoustic backing band and have a guitar standing by for you if you need one.

The National Traditional Country Music Association is a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation devoted to the preservation, perpetuation, and performance of America’s older and more traditional and classic genres of music that might fall under the umbrella term, ‘country’ music. We have been established since 1976.

Thank you Pie for your contributions to the music we care about, and if it be the case, thank you for allowing us to honor you with this award.

Sincerely,

Bob Everhart, President since 1976

National Traditional Country Music Association

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Women of Substance Radio selects “So Little Has Changed” for Americana playlist!!

“So Little Has Changed”, was added to the playlist on the Americana segment each week, Oct.-Dec. 2012 on Women of  Substance radio show!  PuffBunny congratulates both Taylor Pie for being chosen by this wonderful online radio station and Woman of Substance for recognizing her depth and quality as a songpoet and PuffBunny recording artist.   Their Americana show airs on Mondays from 3-4pm Pacific time and from 6-7pm Eastern time.  Tune in and  let them know of your support!

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“The Music Never Dies” Les Marcott inView/Scene4 Magazine December 2012

Les Marcott

Taylor Pie – The Music Never Dies

inView/ Scene4  Magazine

December 2012

The Pozo- Seco Singers were one of the groups I had a strong affinity for when I “discovered” folk music in the late 80’s, and early 90’s. Sure it was some twenty odd years after the great folk scare was over, but I was much too young to experience it first hand. And while punk and grunge may have been the predominate movements at the time, I felt more comfortable strapping on an acoustic guitar and wailing on my Hohner harmonica. (still do) I took it all in – from the protest music of Woody Guthrie, Phil Ochs, Pete Seeger, and early Bob Dylan to the traditional mountain music of the Carter Family, Doc Watson and on to the more introspective folk stylings of Tim Hardin, Fred Neil, Leonard Cohen, Ian and Sylvia, and Gordon Lightfoot. At about that same time, a New Folk Movement was brewing and featured a new breed of articulate folk artists like John Gorka, Shawn Colvin, Suzanne Vega, and Tracy Chapman. The faces may have changed, but the great folk tradition lived on.

I remember the first time I picked up a Pozo- Seco album. It was in one of those quaint little used record stores that don’t exist anymore. The cover comprised a photo of the trio that made up Pozo- Seco: Don Williams, Lofton Kline, and the fetching blonde in the center – Susan Taylor. As it turned out, Taylor had the heavenly voice to match the angelic visage. She teamed up with Williams and Kline in Corpus Christi, Texas in 1964 and helped propel the group to national fame. The song that provided the spark the group needed was Time, written by a wise beyond his years Michael Merchant. Merchant was a friend of Taylor’s and immediately impressed her with the words and melody. The song was a bittersweet rumination on what else…time. The song would rise to the top of the charts in the influential Los Angeles, Chicago and Boston radio markets. This success garnered attention from the promotion team at Columbia records. The trio were signed to a record deal and later managed by the legendary, influential folk impresario Albert Grossman. One cannot over-emphasize the importance of the Grossman connection. He did not waste his time on the untalented and the undedicated. His roster over time also included Dylan, Peter, Paul & Mary, Ian & Sylvia, Lightfoot, The Band, and Janis Joplin. Kline would later leave the group and was replaced by Ron Shaw (he of the Hillside Singers I’d Like to Teach The World To Sing fame).

The Pozos disbanded in 1970, but the individual members went on to productive musical endeavors. Williams catapulted to country music superstardom in the 70’s and 80’s. Kline and Shaw would stay engaged with musical projects. And Susan Taylor? Well, as it turns out, she didn’t do so shabby herself. Now performing as Taylor Pie (her friends just call her Pie), it seems the music never died. These days she is just as busy as she ever was. It was a thrill to catch up with her recently and discuss life after The Pozo-Seco Singers.

We started off by discussing the imminent release of Finally Getting Home on her own label Puff Bunny Records. Susan-Taylor-crIt’s a company started with the help of old high school chums Kathy Harrison, and Eben Wood. It was her first solo effort after the breakup of Pozo-Seco. Produced by the highly regarded Allen Reynolds, the album was originally released in 1972 but didn’t receive a fair shake due to disagreement about how to market it. It didn’t fit into a nice and neat category. Rooted in folk, the songs veer toward country, blues, and pop as well. We would call it Americana now but in 1972 that format didn’t exist. And back then radio was the be all and end all for a record’s success. What should have been one of the best albums of 1972 is poised to become one of the best albums of 2012. It sounds as fresh today as it did back forty years ago. Standout tracks include Looking Through The Looking Glass, Sand Mountain Blues, and a cover of Dolly Parton’s Blue Ridge Mountain Boy. It is with Blue Ridge Mountain Boy that Pie takes the song to a place where Parton was afraid to go. Ignoring an up-tempo shift in the middle of Parton’s version, Pie lays out that beautiful voice of hers and wrings out every bit of emotion laden in those heartbreaking lyrics. While Parton may have seen a sliver of hope, Pie makes no pretensions and that makes her version that much more powerful. Also coming in January is a rerelease of Pozo-Seco material called Shades of Time by Real Gone music.

It was about the time of the initial Finally Getting Home recording that Pie decided to head out for New York and began to hone her skills as a songwriter. She played at venerable folk clubs like Folk City and The Bottom Line. These clubs, essential to the spread of the earlier folk movement began to transition to singer/songwriter venues in the 70’s in order to survive. Pie told me the story about the night Bette Midler wandered into Folk City and heard her play. Pie offered to buy Midler a drink but Bette replied “I need to buy you a drink, this place is a dump”. By that time, Mike Porco who was always a champion of the folk crowd had allowed his establishment to become unkempt and dissolve into a sad state of disrepair. Midler would go on to use one of Pie’s songs in her Clams on the Half Shell Review.

In the 80’s Pie hung out with Arlo Guthrie and others ensconced in an energized folk scene happening in the Berkshires of western Massachusetts. She played there and made a decent living until that scene eventually fizzled out. But no matter where Pie called home, she always made it back to Nashville twice a year to write – often with Reynolds and Dickey Lee. Her songs were covered by popular country artists Mickey Gilley, Tanya Tucker, the Forester Sisters, John Conlee and her once former band mate Don Williams to name a few. In 1986, she bought a 20 acre farm in Liberty, Tennessee which she still calls home today. It is there that she presides as music director at the Liberty Arts Center where she is engaged in promoting house concerts. Visiting musicians play in an intimate setting that the center provides.

Once you talk to Taylor Pie, you can’t help but be impressed by her exuberance and positive vibe. That having been said, one cannot dismiss all of the hardships, disappointments, and frustration she has endured in a long career. Just some of the obstacles she encountered include: record and publishing deals promised but never materialized, being a woman and trying to break into the good ol’ boy 70’s Nashville songwriter’s clique, and staying true to her folk roots when going mainstream would have been more advantageous for her career. But through all of those trials and tribulations, Pie never gave up. It always came down to the music and that marvelous voice. And Pie made it clear to me that having Allen Reynolds in her corner as friend, mentor, and encourager didn’t hurt either. Perhaps one of the last true gentleman in the music business, he was an old school guy who could seal deals with just a handshake.

In order to get a glimpse into Pie’s songwriting process, I asked her about a song she had written and recorded in 2007 called So Little Has Changed. Written after watching a news report about war torn Afghanistan, the sentiments expressed hearken back to Pete Seeger’s classic anti-war song Where Have All The Flowers Gone. Within the song’s lyrics, Pie skillfully evokes the imagery of her father who was a distinguished WWII fighter pilot. Upon returning home, he threw all of his medals away becoming disheartened and disillusioned with what he had experienced in battle. As she so aptly puts it, they killed so many, we killed so many more. …So little has changed. As a writer of songs myself, I began to calculate in my mind the time and energy required to create such a brilliant song. I concluded that it evolved into a lengthy process perhaps requiring weeks. Pie disabused me of that conclusion almost immediately. “It basically wrote itself”, she replied. It was finished in most of one day.

I also asked Pie about the role social media has had on her career and music. Without hesitating she told me “It’s been a savior”. It has reinvigorated and rejuvenated a fan base that was always there but didn’t know where to find her. Now they know, and the response has been overwhelming. I’d be remiss if I didn’t ask her about the possibility of a Pozo-Seco reunion, but according to Pie that doesn’t appear to be in the offing anytime soon.

Sometimes success can’t be measured in purely monetary terms. It comes down to being able to do things on your own terms. And by that yardstick, Taylor Pie has been hugely successful. The music never dies.

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Lucky Boyd Reviews Taylor Pie’s, “So Little Has Changed” CD!

SO LITTLE HAS CHANGED    ©2007 Puff Bunny Records
MTM267801
Review by Lucky Boyd, Co-Founder, MyTexasMusic.com

“Now and again, one can feel like a latecomer to the party.  It can be so obvious that something wonderful has been missed.  It might invoke the question, “Where have I been.”  And, while enlightening, it can be almost embarrassing that you didn’t arrive on time.  Take that feeling into listening to an album called SO LITTLE HAS CHANGED.  Realize now that the pickers on the album have been around long enough for you to know who they are.  You’ve probably even heard their work before, but yet, you might not know any of them by name.  Name or not, you will now know them by their music.  Their fearless leader, Taylor Pie, is not a newcomer to this scene.  None of the pickers are up-and-coming, guitar shredding, next-new-thing slingers, either.  No, this bunch has seen some great times in some great places and recorded with some great folks.  But now, here they are, together again, and guess what.. so little has changed.  Veterans for sure, but once you bite into this music, you will realize that Taylor Pie can hold her own vocally with anyone singing today.  She can stand lyrically next to any writer you can name, and these musicians, often with just ad lib noodles, have been able to record one of the most masterfully orchestrated studio pieces around.  I experienced the disc through headphones, which I might suggest, is an awesome way to listen to this record.  The engineering is genius through out, taking simple, tasteful performances and sitting you right in the middle of them.  Each instrumentation, each fill, each solo, is another object, seemingly floating at you as if in an underwater sea of beauty; methodic, enlivening, and perfect in form.  A good number of co-writes and covers are peppered in with Taylor Pie’s offerings, and the list of pickers is certainly known by those who know, but it’s time that music fans get a taste of what’s been behind the curtain for so long.  Introduce yourself to Taylor Pie.  Once you know that so little has changed, you will wish you had arrived at the party much earlier.”

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Spider Johnson to Perform at PuffBunny House Concert Series – Saturday, October, 15, 2011

For Immediate Release: October 10, 2011

Spider Johnson

Longtime Mason/Castell area artist/musician, Spider Johnson, joins Bobby Zamora and host, Graham Warwick for a PuffBunny House Concert evening of acoustic folk music on the back patio at Fredericksburg’s historic Altmeuller Haus, 216 East Austin Street. One of oldest dogtrot houses in Fredericksburg, the Altmeuller Haus is conveniently located next door to the Fredericksburg Visitor’s Center and Chamber of Commerce. Bluesman Graham Warwick will warm the crowd up around 7pm, and Bobby will take the stage around 7:30pm, followed by Spider around 8pm.

Spider Johnson is part of the Lubbock music legacy that has produced such luminaries as Buddy Holly, Joe Ely, The Flatlanders, Terry Allen and too many others to list here. While he has maintained a career as a visual artist, music has always remained a passion and he performs “just enough to support my music habit.” Spider has performed and recorded with many notables which included a stint on PBS on Austin City Limits with Townes Van Zandt, Butch Hancock, David Halley and Jimmie Dale Gilmore.

“Spider’s stories are just as entertaining as his songs and we are excited to feature him in an intimate setting, where people can really listen.” says Warwick, who also hosts an afternoon picker’s circle called, “Pickin’ on the Porch” at the Altmeuller Haus from 1-4pm each Saturday.

“Bobby Zamora writes and sings mostly goofy songs. Songs about love lost, love never realized, unfortunate bodily functions. He’s done this for some 40 years, but just completed what he considers his first official CD — “Songs of Grief and Misery.” Is it a polished piece? No. Does it benefit from a host of multitalented contributors? Certainly not. Was it years in the making? Nope. Is it done? Yes. As far as Bobby Zamora’s concerned..”

This is the second in a cozy monthly series of house concerts sponsored by Puff Bunny Records. Water, sodas, and tea, are provided, but it’s BYOB, along with your favorite lawn chair and a potluck snack to share if you wish. There are some chairs available, though seating is limited. As host, Graham Warwick says, “IT’S BRING YOUR OWN EVERYTHING!”

For more information about “PuffBunny House Concert Series” evenings, or “Pickin On The Porch” afternoons, Call: 830/ 990-0127 or RSVP Email: puffbunny@usa.com or visit puffbunnyrecords.com Suggested contribution is $15.

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Folk singer performs songs from the heart Finger Lake Times Friday, June 3, 2011

OUT & ABOUT
Finger Lake Times
Friday, June 3, 2011

Folk singer performs songs from the heart

By Emily McFaul

Nashville-based folk star Taylor Pie will take the stage this week to sing not only beloved favorites, but also new songs from the heart with fellow folk singer and friend Jim Clare.

Clare, a Canandaigua resident, arranged the dates for Pie, whom he first heard in the 1960’s when she was performing with the Pozo-Seco Singers as Susan Taylor. The group’s song, “Time,” a wistful ballad about the fleetingness of life, was a hit both in the Pozo’s hometown of Corpus Christi, Texas and at radio stations in major cities.

“They were a pretty well known group,” recalls Clare.

It was a song that Clare- a folk aficionado since college- often played with his friends in performances at bars and parties during their down time from Naval training near Corpus Christi.

“They sang all of our songs at beach parties,” says Pie, who connected with Clare a few years ago on Facebook. “We might have even been partying next to each other on the beach!”

These days, Clare has returned to songwriting and performing, releasing an album called, “Old Empty Hall” in 2009. Last year, he joined Pie for a gig in Pennsylvania, and he’s looking forward to performing with her again.

Not only is Pie an accomplished guitar finger-picker, says Clare, but her voice, songwriting skills and stage presence hit home with her audience.

“She has a very compelling voice and way of singing the songs,” says Clare. “She has a real way of connecting with local folks.”

For her part- despite a busy schedule that includes a stop at WXXI for a chat with “Open Tuning” show host Scott Regan – Pie is hoping for a chance to sit down and collaborate with Clare.

I totally admire his songwriting style, because he’s a storyteller,” says Pie. “For me, songs were always something that evolved from life itself, as we live it in the emotional body. I don’t know how to write anything unless it comes from the heart – I have to feel the feeling first.”

For instance, Pie’s song, “When All That’s Left To Say is Good-bye,” grew out of watching a close friend die of cancer. It took two years after her friend’s passing to be able to perform the song in public -but for Pie, putting her heart and soul into her work and her performances is a kind of emotional catharsis.

If I can write a song, then it’s like exorcising that feeling out of me,” she says. “I can just move on.”

Fans are similarly touched by those heartfelt emotions – and another song Pie released in 2007 called, “So Little Has Changed,” also strikes a chord with many listeners.

While some label it an antiwar song, Pie likes to call it a peace song. Inspired by the memory of her father, a decorated World War II pilot, telling her about the uselessness of war, the song came together when Pie saw a new report on yet another group of soldiers killed in Afghanistan.

“It took me back to the days of Vietnam, when I lost quite a few friends,” says Pie. “And I thought, ‘Here we go again! For all of our progress technologically, so little has changed.”

With a wellspring of emotions to draw from, and the music of antiwar folk songwriter Tom Paxton as inspiration, Pie says the song was an easy one to write.

“The words just came,” she recalls. “The song just poured right out.”

Those catching one of Pie’s local performances can expect to hear some of her more recent songs, as well as several of Clare’s works. His song “Old Empty Hall” actually pays tribute to one of the venues – Fatzinger Hall at the Waterloo Library, a well-known boyhood stop for Clare.

“The first thing I had in my little plastic alligator wallet was a Waterloo library card,” recalls Clare, who grew up on a farm in Waterloo that’s now the site of a housing development.

Of course, audience members can also expect to hear “Time,” still considered Pie’s biggest hit.

“They won’t let me get away with not singing it,” she laughs.

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Taylor Pie joins Eben Wood & other Texas artists for KFAN Radio’s Windows on Texas

Taylor Pie andEben Wood  are among 17 music acts performing this weekend for Texas Rebel Radio’s Windows on Texas 9th season!

 

Windows: Totally Texas
by Phil Houseal

Phil Houseal

Phil Houseal

Jan 12, 2011

What started as a spark of an idea in 2002 has become an event that lights up January with the blazing talent of Texas music. This weekend marks the 9th season of Windows on Texas, a showcase for music that is totally Texas.

“This event is about and for music,” said Dawn Dale, Program Director of founding sponsor KFAN radio. “It is supporting the Texas music industry, bringing independent Texas artists to the forefront. We go to great effort to bring in the music industry and acquaint them with artists we believe in.”

Jayson and Jan Fritz of Fritz Broadcasting first put together the mid-winter event at the urging of Ernie Loeffler of the Fredericksburg Convention and Visitors Bureau. One original goal was to add an event to draw visitors to Fredericksburg during a traditionally slower time of year.

It has grown to include 17 musical acts performing at 10 venues over four nights, according to Dale. It is also more than that.

“The whole point with Windows is not that we are featuring bars; we are featuring everything Texas,” Dale said. “We are trying to highlight all of the beautiful industries of the area, as well as venues that support these artists.”

This year, some of those artists include Bad Rodeo (“We couldn’t be more excited about that one – those guys are incredible and they are a KFAN core artist”), Taylor Pie, Melissa Ludwig, and Charlie Montague.

Another goal is to put Texas artists in front of music promoters and record labels. According to Dale, this interaction has benefited both artist and the music business.

“Often, just our booking a group for Windows leads to activity before they get here. By July and August as we are beginning to release the names of people to be included, quite often the industry has reached out to these artists.”

So what exactly is Texas music?

Dale laughed and quoted the icon of Texas Music – Willie Nelson. “He said, it’s music out of Texas, then he shrugged and raised an eyebrow.”

Of course that now encompasses everything from country to blues, rock, swing, light jazz, and Americana. “We have something for everybody,” Dale said.

The event now also garners national attention. Texas music is hot everywhere, and Dale notes there are people from outside state of Texas who have made this their annual vacation past several years.

“They come seek us out,” she said.

Music fans are still surprised that every performance is free. This largesse is thanks to generous support from underwriters and sponsors.

“There are expenses, but everything is still free,” Dale confirmed. “That’s due to a huge thanks to our sponsors; without them we can’t do it. It has become a year round project.”

The “Fabulous Sunday Night Wrap-Up Show” will be held for the first time at The Crossroads in Fredericksburg, from 5-10pm. It features Elliot Park, Madison Monroe, and Bad Rodeo. It is also free, but due to the limited venue guests must pick up tickets at any of the other venues.

Dale urges music fans to get out to at least one of the Windows on Texas events.

“I think the Hill Country enjoys a tremendous opportunity to have music brought to them year round,” Dale said. “I really thank our fans for this being our ninth year. They fill every venue, and it is their enthusiasm and their energy that helps bring these artists who bless our lives every day.”
www.fullhouseproductions.net

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Taylor Pie, Former Pozo Seco Singers Vocalist, Returns to Texas for a Rare Series of Dates in Corpus Christi, Austin

Time

Time

By Graham Warwick

This story begins back in 1964, the heyday of folk music, when a little known twosome in Corpus Christi, Texas. Don Williams and Lofton Kline – aka The Strangers Two – met Susan Taylor, a 17-year old Ray High School student with a quick wit and a voice to die for. She was already a familiar face in town, performing weekly at Mott’s Steak House and Del Mar College hootenannies.

The two became three and they called themselves The Pozo Seco Singers. The trio recorded a song called “Time” which charted number one in the folk-friendly big markets of Los Angeles, Chicago and Boston. Columbia Records signed the group and over the next five years, the Pozo Seco Singers recorded four albums. The band was a big deal in Corpus Christi, TX.

In October, Taylor Pie (the name she adopted for herself as a solo performer) is returning home to Corpus Christi for the Ray High School Class of 1965 Reunion. Performances are scheduled Sunday, Oct. 10, on KEDT-FM’s “Some Call It Folk” program; Monday, Oct. 11, at the Burning Bush Concert Series; and Friday, Oct. 15, at the Corpus Christi Art Center. Taylor also appeared at the Southwest Regional Folk Alliance in Austin. She returns to Austin on Saturday, Oct. 16, at Austin’s Acoustical Café.

Around 1970, Don Williams struck out on his own wildly successful solo career; but he was not entirely on his own. Taylor co-produced with Allen Reynolds, sang and played guitar on three of his chart singles while co-producing her own solo album, Finally Getting Home, on JMI Records.

Taylor eventually found her way to the folk clubs of New York, plying her songwriting wares in clubs like O’Lunney’s, Folk City, and The Bottom Line, sharing the stage with luminaries like Don McLean, and Tom Pacheco. Her song, “Back in the Bars” caught Bette Midler’s ear and she used it for a skit in her “Clams on the Half Shell Revue.”

As she began to focus more and more on songwriting, Taylor gravitated towards the irresistible pull of Nashville. Artists such as Bette Midler, Tanya Tucker, Mickey Gilley, the Forester Sisters, Terri Hendrix and Don Williams have all recorded her songs. “Just Like Angels,” was nominated for the gospel Dove Award, and “Full Grown Fool” gave Mickey Gilley a top twenty hit.

As many great songwriters do, she finally got fed up with the whole scene. In an effort to separate herself from that rat-race life, Taylor reinvented herself. She started calling herself Taylor Pie. And as all great songwriters do, Taylor took all of the frustration, disappointment, depression and anger, shaped it into poetry and poured into it a mold. The result was a self-produced CD, Long Ride Home.

Austin singer-songwriter Terri Hendrix first heard of Pie from her manager, Dick Renko.

“I received her CD in the mail around 2002 via my agent at the time and he was blown away by her music,” Hendrix recalled. “He knew I would be too.
“I listened to her song ‘Long Ride Home’ about 100 times in a row, so, I had no choice but to record it.” She continued. “I loved it. Her guitar work, lyrics, and vocals are amazing and their depth gets to me with every listen.”

Hendrix also recorded Pie’s “Walking on the Moon”, co-written with Herb McCullough on her children’s CD, Celebrate The Difference. “That song pulled my heart strings as well,” she said.

In 2005, Pie was in Corpus Christi for her induction into the South Texas Music Walk of Fame and reconnected with an old friend and guitar player, Eben Wood, to perform a few dates in Texas. Later that year, Eben ran into another old Ray High School classmate of Pie’s, Katheryn Harrison, at their 40th Reunion from Ray High School and mentioned the gigs and how much fun they both had. This prompted Harrison to contact Pie and encourage her to come down to perform in Texas more often.

With their friendship rekindled, Pie, Wood and Harrison started up a new record company, PuffBunny Records. The company is named after a pipe that they owned in the 1960’s that was used for dubious purposes.

So Little Has Changed

So Little Has Changed

The first product of their collaboration, “So Little Has Changed” is a folk masterpiece. Every song is expertly written, produced, and performed. Pie assembled an incredibly talented and artistic group of picker/friends; beginning with Eben Wood, and including Dave Pomeroy, Kenny Malone, and Russ Pahl. The result is truly magical.

The CD shows Pie’s eclectic, jazzy-bluesy side with the first selection “Jar Full of Kisses”. A jazz “standard” if I ever heard one! “Back to Balsam Blues” is a catchy country bass thumping blues number, and “Full Grown Fool”, as noted above, charted in the top twenty for Mickey Gilley. “Cypress Lake” was made into a Pie video on YouTube. “Dancin’ on the Sunny Side of the Moon” is a light-hearted waltz ending with the enthusiastic if not a little bit crazy Sunny Side Choir.

So Little Has Changed has caught the ears of some Texas Hill Country deejays, namely John Aielli, longtime host of KUT’s celebrated program Ekletikos. “I fell in love with ‘Time’ not only for the tune and words, but for her voice,” Aielli said. Pie’s song “Jar Of Kisses” was also featured on XM Radio’s “The Village” program as one of the Top 2009 New Release Spins.

Fredericksburg’s KFAN, 107.9 – www.texasrebelradio.com – has been wearing out the CD since they received it. Dawn Dale, KFAN’s program director says, “Taylor Pie fully embraces and emphasizes the very spirit of the Americana music genre. Her lyrics are rich and her vocals are fully captivating. Taylor Pie is a Texas rebel, radio-defining artist.”

Her latest project Taylor Pie with Eben Wood Live at Hondo’s, is a live recording of a Taylor Pie and Eben Wood concert at Hondo’s On Main in Fredericksburg, TX.

This collection has songs that are new and some that are previously recorded. The most profound thing about this CD is how solid a live performer Pie is. Each and every one of the songs are performed with grace and style. Eben Wood’s lead guitar is dead-on perfect. Pie’s voice is clear and full, and the audience is clearly enthralled.

Taylor Pie is truly a talented folk artist/tunesmith/performer/producer. Fans of the Pozo Seco Singers and true “folkies” have a chance to see her live in Austin or Corpus Christi in October.

For more info on Taylor Pie go to these web sites:

http://www.taylorpie.com
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ksEZ1bAMEh4
http://www.puffbunnyrecords.com/
http://www.myspace.com/tpie09

    TAYLOR PIE DISCOGRAPHY:

    Albums:
    • Time (Columbia Records, 1966) US #127
    • I Can Make it With You (Columbia, 1967) US #81
    • Shades of Time (Columbia, 1968)
    • Spend Some Time With Me (1970)
    • Finally Getting Home (JMI Records 1972)
    • Long Ride Home (Pecan Pie Music 2003)
    • So Little Has Changed (Puff Bunny, 2008)
    • Live At Hondo’s (2009)

    Singles:
    • “Time” (1966) U.S. #47
    • “I Can Make it With You” (1966) U.S. #32
    • “Look What You’ve Done” (1967) U.S. #32
    • “I Believed it All” (1967) U.S. #96
    • “Louisiana Man” (1967) U.S. #97

    FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:

    Kathryn Harrison/Puff Bunny Records
    216 E. Austin Fredericksburg, Texas 78624
    (830) 739-3244 kaneha@aol.com

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